Car crashes into tree closing Mitchell Highway in central Queensland

A car has crashed into a tree in central Queensland on Saturday morning, closing the Mitchell Highway. The incident occurred about 6.45am near Augathella, 35 kilometres north of Charleville. A driver has been taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries, after crashing into a tree in central Queensland. Photo: Supplied The driver of the vehicle was taken to Charleville Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. Police have put diversions in place for cars, but the highway is closed for heavy vehicles. Stay informed. Like the Brisbane Times Facebook page.

FFA Cup 2016: Tim Cahill magic brings Melbourne City its first silverware Less than three years after shelling out more than $11 million to buy the struggling Melbourne Heart, the Manchester-based City Football Group now has the first return on its investment after the renamed Melbourne City won its first ever men's trophy, the FFA Cup, in front of a record cup crowd of nearly 19,000 at a raucous AAMI Park on Wednesday night. The big nights in sport invariably produce compelling storylines and this was no different, with the man who has been the standard bearer for the Australian game both at international and club level, Tim Cahill, delivering on the biggest occasion in City's history. Paradise City: Tim Cahill, City coach John van 't Schip and captain Bruno Fornaroli celebrate. Photo: Getty Images Cahill is being handsomely ...

Sydney 2016: Exorbitant tolls gouging Sydney motorists We are fortunate to live on the lower north shore, yet our family pays over $3000 a year in tolls ("Have Sydney motorists hit their limit with toll roads", November 21). A person travelling to work and back from Epping to Rosebery will pay more than $30 a day in tolls. By international standards, these tolls are exorbitant and simply transfer after-tax dollars from citizens to company profits. Illustration: Alan Moir  Funds for infrastructure development are available to governments at very low interest rates. Governments once had the capacity to supervise major infrastructure works, now they simply off-load their responsibility through private-public partnerships, which inevitably favour the private sector and generate huge profits. At one point conservative governments were concerned at the economic impact ...

Fierce critic of mainstream economics spoke out against neoliberalism Obituary JOHN LEGGE John Legge, writer, teacher, social commentator.  Writer, teacher, commentator 9-1-1942 – 2-11-2016 Author and social commentator John Legge was widely known for his fierce criticism of mainstream economics and the savage inequities stoked by neoliberalism. His writing over 25 years was published in nine books, in many articles for Dissent magazine and in sharply worded opinion pieces and letters in The Age. John Michael Legge was born in Sydney, the eldest of four brothers. His political consciousness was formed in the context of World War II and the controversy over communism in Australia. In 1950, John's father, Jack, moved the family to Melbourne after taking a position in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Melbourne and the family settled in Greensborough. Jack was a communist at ...

Queensland constable suspended over misconduct allegations A Queensland police officer has been suspended over allegations of misconduct and perverting the course of justice. The Crime and Corruption Commission alleges the 27-year-old constable carried out a number of unauthorised searches of the Queensland Police Service's Qprime database system and disclosed that information to associates. A Queensland police constable has been suspended over misconduct allegations.  Photo: Photo Tom Threadingham / Gatton During the CCC's investigation, it also identified that the officer allegedly attempted to pervert the course of justice following a routine traffic interception of a friend by police in Brisbane. He is charged with misconduct in relation to public office and attempting to pervert the course of justice and is due to appear at Mackay Magistrates Court on December 14. AAP

Income falls after a child's cancer diagnosis MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 -- After a child's cancer diagnosis, parents' income often drops and mothers frequently stop working, a new study finds. Moreover, the financial effects of a cancer diagnosis can last years, with mothers' earnings dipping significantly more than fathers' pay, the study suggests. Mothers' incomes fell 21 percent in the first year after a child developed cancer versus 10 percent for fathers, according to the study. "In addition to differences between mothers and fathers, we found that a younger age of parents and lower level of education ... were associated with more adverse effects on income," said study author Emma Hoven, of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Researchers tracked more than 3,600 parents in Sweden whose 1,900 children were diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2009. The parents were compared to a group ...

Susan Kiefel becomes Australia's first female High Court chief justice Susan Kiefel has been named as Australia's first female High Court chief justice – ending 113 years of men leading the nation's highest court.   After months of speculation about who would replace retiring chief Robert French, the Turnbull government appointed serving High Court Justice Kiefel to the role on Tuesday. Brisbane-based Federal Court Justice James Edelman, who is just 42, will replace her as puisne judge – a judge other than the chief justice.  Chief Justice French said in March he would stand down in January, ahead of his 70th birthday and in order to allow his successor to be in place for the start of the new year sittings on January 30. Justice Susan Kiefel at her swearing in to the Australian High Court in 2007. Photo: Glen McCurtayne ...

Hospitals' preprogrammed drug doses too high for older adults: Study TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 -- Preprogrammed doses of medications that can raise the risk of falls are often set too high for older hospital patients, new research shows. In the study, doctors looked at the records of 287 patients over the age of 65 who fell while staying in a large urban hospital. Some patients fell more than once, adding to a total of 328 falls in the study. Of those falls, 62 percent occurred in patients who had been given at least one high-risk medication in the 24 hours before their fall. Of that 62 percent, 16 percent had been given two high-risk medicines, while another 16 percent had been given three or more. And 41 percent of the medications studied were electronically set at doses that were greater than recommended for older patients. The 29 medicines ...